Lemon Zucchini Bread

Looking for a sweet summer treat that will leave both your taste buds and belly feeling happy? We have just the thing! Enjoy this low FODMAP lemon zucchini bread that is sure to be a crowd pleaser!  It’s also gluten free, dairy free, nut free and easy to make!  We doubled the recipe to make 5 mini loaves and they disappeared in 24 hours.

 

Lemon Zucchini Bread
The Best Lemon Zucchini bread ever. NOTE: we used gluten free flour, but for those who do not need to be gluten free, simply substitute regular all purpose flour.
Servings1 Large Loaf
Prep Time20 Min.
Cook Time45-50 Min.
Ingredients
Lemon Zucchini Bread
Glaze
Instructions
  1. 1. In medium mixing bowl combine flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt; set aside 2. In a separate mixing bowl combine sugar, zucchini, avocado oil, egg, lemon juice, and lemon zest. Stir to combine. 3. Add in dry ingredients to zucchini mixture; stir just until combined 4. Spoon batter into greased bread pan 5. Bake at 350 degree for 50-55 minutes or until golden brown and let set. 6. Cool in pan on wire rack for 15 min, then remove from pan and let cool 7. Once bread has cooled, combine ingredients for glaze and drizzle over the bread
Recipe Notes

There is no Nutrition Label for this recipe yet.

Lemon Zucchini Bread

Looking for a sweet summer treat that will leave both your taste buds and belly feeling happy? We have just the thing!

Enjoy this low FODMAP lemon zucchini bread that is sure to be a crowd pleaser!  It’s also gluten free, dairy free, nut free and easy to make!  We doubled the recipe to make 5 mini loaves and they disappeared in 24 hours.

Lemon Zucchini Bread
The Best Lemon Zucchini bread ever. NOTE: we used gluten free flour, but for those who do not need to be gluten free, simply substitute regular all purpose flour.
Servings1 Large Loaf
Prep Time20 Min.
Cook Time45-50 Min.
Ingredients
Lemon Zucchini Bread
Glaze
Instructions
  1. In medium mixing bowl combine flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt; set aside In a separate mixing bowl combine sugar, zucchini, avocado oil, egg, lemon juice, and lemon zest. Stir to combine. Add in dry ingredients to zucchini mixture; stir just until combined Spoon batter into greased bread pan Bake at 350 degree for 50-55 minutes or until golden brown and let set. Cool in pan on wire rack for 15 min, then remove from pan and let cool Once bread has cooled, combine ingredients for glaze and drizzle over the bread

Quinoa Salad

Here is a recipe for a delicious and nutritious summer salad. Best part, it’s low FODMAP too!

Quinoa Salad
Low FODMAP, Gluten-Free
Servings4-6
Prep Time20 minutes
Cook Time20 minutes
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. In a large skillet, on medium heat, heat 2 teaspoons of sesame oil. Add in pine nuts, sunflower seeds, and chopped walnuts and cook until toasted.
  2. Add quinoa and 2 1/2 cups of water in pot and bring to boil. Once fully boiling, cover and reduce heat. Cook 15-20 until water is fully absorbed.
  3. While the quinoa is cooking, chop the arugula, parsley, and raspberries.
  4. Once quinoa is cooked, add it to a mixing bowl and fold in toasted nuts and seeds, raspberries, arugula, and parsley. Add a teaspoon of sesame oil, salt, and pepper, as desired.
  5. Enjoy!

Quinoa Salad

Here is a recipe for a delicious and nutritious summer salad. Best part, it’s low FODMAP too!

Quinoa Salad
Low FODMAP, Gluten-Free
Servings4-6
Prep Time20 minutes
Cook Time20 minutes
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. In a large skillet, on medium heat, heat 2 teaspoons of sesame oil. Add in pine nuts, sunflower seeds, and sliced almonds and cook until toasted.
  2. Add quinoa and 2 1/2 cups of water in pot and bring to boil. Once fully boiling, cover and reduce heat. Cook 15-20 until water is fully absorbed.
  3. While the quinoa is cooking, chop the arugula, parsley, and cranberries.
  4. Once quinoa is cooked, add it to a mixing bowl and fold in toasted nuts and seeds, dried cranberries, arugula, and parsley. Add a teaspoon of sesame oil, salt, and pepper, as desired.
  5. Enjoy!

Spice Up Your Life

We use spices everyday while we’re cooking to add a little flavor and punch to classic dishes. By adding different spices to your foods, not only are you adding a tasty twist, but you could also be adding health benefits to your meal. Different spices can help combat disease and boost our bodies’ functions.

What’s the deal with ginger?

Suffer from motion sickness? Ginger largely helps us in reducing nausea caused by motion and shortens recovery time after experiencing motion sickness. It helps if you consume the ginger before being exposed to the motion sickness, as well as after. What about morning sickness? As with motion sickness, increasing your intake of ginger can really help ease the feelings of morning sickness. Another interesting feature of ginger is that it can help combat the feelings of nausea caused by chemotherapy. In this situation, it is recommended to take 250 mg of ginger powder twice a day. Beyond anti-nausea benefits, ginger can also serve as an antioxidant. Antioxidants help to counteract the damaging effects of free radicals. Ginger can also boost your immune system and cut back inflammation

Here are a couple of ways to add ginger to your diet: as a hot tea, in a soup, flavoring up a stir-fry, on top of a salad

What about curcumin in turmeric?

Curcumin is an ingredient in turmeric and is what makes curry powder and mustard yellow. Curcumin can act as an anti-inflammatory factor. As we know, inflammation becomes a problem when it occurs long term and interferes with normal body functions. Many health issues, like cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, and arthritis involve chronic inflammation. Therefore, consuming an anti-inflammatory spice like curcumin could help your body combat inflammation and disease. Like ginger, curcumin can act as an antioxidant. It does this by blocking free radicals as well as boosting the body’s antioxidant enzymes. Not only does curcumin help out how your body functions, but also how your brain functions. Curcumin can boost brain function and memory. Along with this, there is also some evidence that curcumin can help individuals with depression.

Cooking with turmeric tip: mix with black pepper to increase it’s absorption into the body!

Don’t forget cinnamon!

As with ginger and turmeric, cinnamon is a high source of protective antioxidants. As an
antioxidant, it scavenges for free radicals to reduce oxidative stress and fight disease. Cinnamon contains different kinds of flavonoids that help fight inflammation. Because if it’s ability to combat inflammation, cinnamon can be helpful to reduce pain related with inflammation such as sore muscles, pre-menstrual pain, joint pain, among others. Cinnamon has been shown to be beneficial
in favor of heart health. It works to reduce levels of bad cholesterol, known as LDL, and helps to stabilize blood pressure and circulation. A specific health issue that cinnamon helps with is diabetes. Cinnamon can aid in lowering blood sugar levels. In addition to this, it can improve sensitivity to insulin. We’re not done yet, cinnamon can also boost immunity and protect against bacteria, particularly in your mouth.

Sweet like cinnamon: cinnamon can be used to sweeten recipes so you can cut back on the sugar. Remember women should have no more than 6 teaspoons of sugar a day, and men no more than 9 teaspoons!